Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Speaking of Freedom: A Principled Approach, Part VIII

Hello Again,

While my look at he principles in the Declaration has touched on the high points, and there are others that could be mentioned, I will move on now to the Constitution.

The week of September 17-23 of each year has been designated by Congress as "Constitution Week" and this year I am making it my "project" for that occasion to re-memorize the preamble to that wonderful document. And I will also go over that here as I continue to highlight our Founding Principles.

As I've said before, the Constitution did not happen in a vacuum. It has a context, namely the Bible and the Declaration of Independence. It is derived from those two "parents", if you will. The preamble, then, states the purpose of the Framers in crafting it, referring again to the principles named in the Declaration. Here is the preamble:
  • We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
"We the People" makes reference to the only legitimate authority, "the consent of the governed".

"A more perfect union" refers to the fact that the governing authority in place at the time, The Articles of Confederation" were woefully inadequate for the governance of the nation.

"...establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare" all make reference to legitimate functions of government and are a foreshadowing of the enumerated powers later spelled out in the Constitution itself.

To "...secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity", refers back, and is consistent with, the principle of the purpose of government being to secure the inalienable rights of the governed.

That's all for now, but I would encourage everyone to read, reflect on and even re-memorize the preamble. Doing so can help us in our "liberty evangelism". Never, never, never, never, never give up!

Richard Cochran
Macon County Patriots
September 5, 2012
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